Oct
10

Don't miss Schneider Electric's Design Engineer Seminar

This is the last opportunity of 2018 to see the constantly evolving Schneider Electric Technology Center in St. Louis!

Join the Schneider team for an interactive and hands on education session. This includes lab time and break out of electrical and mechanical sessions, the latest in critical power and cooling trends, industrial applications, prefabricated data centers, and helpful design tools that will keep you on the cutting edge of the latest technologies.

8 PDH credits given at each complimentary seminar.


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For more educational opportunities, please visit P3's Power Quality University menu tab.

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698 Hits
Aug
13

Important FAQ about Arc Flash protection Clothing

What you need to know:

What does 8 cal mean when people say, ‘8 cal shirt or garment’?

This term is really an abbreviation of, or slang for, 8 calories/cm², which are the units of measurement of an arc rating. If someone is saying they need an “8 cal” flame resistant (FR) fabric or garment, what they might really be saying they need is an arc rating of at least 8 calories/cm² or greater to meet a personal protective equipment (PPE) Category 2 requirement as defined by standard NFPA 70E. However, the PPE Category 2 level of protection only starts at 8 calories/cm² and goes up to 25 calories/cm², or PPE Category 3. Obviously, the difference in protection at 8 and 24 calories/cm² is significant, so it’s important to conduct your risk assessment prior to specifying a protection level and to understand that PPE Category 2 is a broad statement.

Is it ok to use fabric softener on FR clothing?

The laundering instructions for all FR and arc rated fabrics prohibit use of fabric softeners because most softeners are flammable and will accrete (build up) on the garment over time. The fabric is still FR, but now a flammable contaminant has been added to the surface and can be ignited by a flash fire or arc flash.

Can you use bug repellent with FR clothing?

When applying insect repellents to garments, a waterborne, permethrin-based insect repellent has been shown in testing to not have an adverse effect on flame resistance. However, it is not recommended to use DEET or DEET-containing insect repellents on any FR fabrics. DEET and DEET-containing insect repellents can be flammable, and therefore, have an adverse effect on the flame resistance of FR garments. It is important to note that DEET and DEET-containing insect repellents do not remove or destroy the flame resistance of fabrics, but they mask it. Once the garment is laundered and the DEET and DEET-containing insect repellents are removed, the flame resistance is still intact.

Is it possible to buy one uniform that protects against both arc flash and flash fire?

Yes, there are fabrics that protect against multiple hazards. However, it’s important to remember that not every fabric does. As you’re putting together your FR clothing program, make sure you discuss your hazards with your supplier and you know the FR fabric brand used to make your garments.

P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the origial full article at: https://ecmweb.tradepub.com

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1016 Hits
Aug
01

Hot Topics: Arc Ratings, NFPA 70E, & More

Is it ok to use fabric softener on FR clothing? Is it possible to buy a uniform that protects against both arc flash and fire? What does 8 cal mean when people say, ‘8 cal shirt or garment’?

In our all-new FAQS, industry technical experts address the questions surrounding the hottest topics of 2018: NFPA 70E, Arc Ratings, and FR.

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  921 Hits
921 Hits
Aug
01

Arc Flash Accidents

Take the time to read through these Forensic Casebook ar­ticles to help enhance practical safety les­sons for your own employees, using these case studies as a training resource for “what not to do.”

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869 Hits
Aug
01

Safer by Design: Arc Energy Reduction Techniques

There are inherent risks associated with working with energized electrical equipment. Even inspecting electrical equipment can expose employees to shock and other risks.

To enhance safety, work on electrical systems should be performed when those systems are de-energized.

Additionally, Zone Selective Interlock (ZSI) technology protects equipment by intelligently selecting faster trip times in coordinated systems, an advantage which can keep operators safe and productive. Learn more by reading this whitepaper.

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790 Hits