Jul
02

Understanding the IEEE Standard 1547 Revision

In February 2018, IEEE 1547-2018 was approved. This new standard has a significant impact on the design and deployment of all DER systems, removes limitations from the original standard, and adds requirements for “smart inverters.” Are you prepared for these changes?

The IEEE Standard 1547 was created to establish a technical standard for interconnecting distributed energy resources (DER) with electrical power systems (EPSs). As technology became more sophisticated, the grid started experiencing increased levels of penetration. In order to maintain bulk system reliability long-term, 1547 was revised to establish new DER requirements.

The new revision, IEEE 1547-2018, is changing the testing standards for critical power-generation systems to create harmonized interconnection requirements and offer flexibility in performance requirements.

ComRent’s latest white paper Understanding the IEEE Standard 1547 Revision explains the changes implemented by the new standard and what you need to know to stay compliant.

Read or download the white paper here>

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See the origial full article at: http://www.ecmweb.com/whitepapers/understanding-ieee-standard-1547-revision

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Jun
25

Microsoft: Don't Use Surge Protectors With Xbox One X, One S

Typically, when you hook up something as valuable as an Xbox One X you want to surge protect it. But Microsoft tells owners not to.

If you go out and purchase expensive electronic devices that require a power outlet to function, another key purchase is surge protection. This usually comes in the form of a power strip with surge protection built-in or a single outlet protector. They bring piece of mind and protect your gadgets. However, Microsoft does not want you to use one with the Xbox One X or One S.

That may sound crazy, but Microsoft does have a legitimate reason why and only itself to blame for not making it clearer to new Xbox One X ($483.00 at Amazon) or One S owners. It turns out both consoles have a built-in surge protector so they are protected without need of a separate device. If you decide to use one anyway, chances are your Xbox won't even turn on.
As Microsoft's Xbox support page explains, if you plug either Xbox One into a surge protected outlet, the console is not capable of reaching the full power draw it needs for "optimal performance." To the user, that presents as a broken Xbox, but it's really just the use of two surge protectors causing the problem.

This may be a more difficult fix than it first seems. If your entire setup is running off surge protected power strips it means buying a new unprotected cable, installing that, and hooking your Xbox up to it. That's an extra cost and some painful cable management depending on how many devices you have sat under your TV.

If you have already tried powering up your Xbox and nothing happened because of this double surge protection problem, your console may need a power reset. That's easy to do, simply unplug the console power cord, remove the external surge protection, wait 10 seconds, then plug the Xbox back in and press the Xbox button. The console should boot as normal.

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See the origial full article at: https://www.pcmag.com/news/357504/microsoft-dont-use-surge-protectors-with-xbox-one-x-one-s

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Jun
18

10 Things about Arc Flash Safety

10 Arc Falsh

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See the origial full article at: http://www.eaton.com/FTC/buildings/KnowledgeCenter/10Thingsaboutarcflashsafety/index.htm?utm_campaign=FTC_Buildings&utm_medium=Email_TDP&utm_source=TDP_Buildings_5&utm_content=Primary_10_Things_To_Know_About_Arc_Flash_Safety_Infographic&elqTrackId=f562e77a029f4812bb1c3c5f59e1d548&elq=ea3a6ffb6fd6464f8d3e54a2b38b79b2&elqaid=16940&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=8267

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Jun
11

Proposed NFPA Standards for Electrical Inspections In the Works

Electrical Inspector GettyImages 177311145 1024

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has two new standards in the works related to electrical inspections and the inspectors who perform them.

The NFPA Technical Committee on Electrical Inspections began work on the proposed standards a year and a half ago. NFPA 78: Guide on Electrical Inspections, and NFPA 1078: Standard for Electrical Inspector Professional Qualifications, both received public input through mid-February this year, and the technical committee is working now on finalizing the first draft of the standards, according to Jeff Sargent, Regional Electrical Code Specialist at NFPA, in a live seminar this afternoon.

The first drafts of the two proposed standards will be released Aug. 22, 2018. If there are no amendments the committee expects to have the final standard by August 2019. If there are certified amendments, the standards will go through a second draft process and be released in August 2020, Sargent said.

He added that the Technical Committee on Electrical Inspections is still looking for more committee members.

NFPA members can find more information, including applications to join the committee, at the NFPA site:

NFPA 78: Guide on Electrical Inspections

NFPA 1078: Standard for Electrical Inspector Professional Qualifications

 

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See the origial full article at: http://www.ecmweb.com/national-electrical-code/proposed-nfpa-standards-electrical-inspections-works?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ECMMostRecent+%28Electrical+Construction+%26+Maintenance%29&sfvc4enews=42&Issue=ECM-01_20180607_ECM-01_472&cl=article_1_b&NL=ECM-01

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Jun
04

The 10 Biggest Grounding Mistakes to Avoid

There’s more to proper grounding and bonding than meets the eye. When tackling this type of work, the end goal is obviously to prevent unwanted voltage on non-current-carrying metal objects and facilitate the correct operation of overcurrent devices. But that doesn’t mean wiring everything to a ground rod and calling it a day. In order to provide safe installations to the public, there are certain subtleties you must follow in order to meet applicable NEC rules.

Proper grounding and bonding prevent unwanted voltage on non-current-carrying metal objects, such as tool and appliance casings, raceways, and enclosures, as well as facilitate the correct operation of overcurrent devices. But beware of wiring everything to a ground rod and considering the job well done. There are certain subtleties you must follow to adhere to applicable NEC rules and provide safe installations to the public and working personnel. Although ground theory is a vast subject, on which whole volumes have been written, let's take a look at some of the most common grounding errors you may run into on a daily basis.

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Failure to Install a Second Ground Rod Where Required

A single ground rod that does not have a resistance to ground of 25 ohms or less must be augmented by a second ground rod. Once the second ground rod is installed, it's not necessary for the two to meet the resistance requirement. As a practical matter, few electricians do the resistance measurement and simply drive a second ground rod. If you install a second rod you must locate it at least 6 feet away from the first rod. Greater distance is even better. If both rods and the bare ground electrode conductor connecting them are directly under the drip line of the roof, ground resistance will be further diminished. This is because the soil along this line is more moist. Ground resistance greatly increases when soil becomes dry.

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Installation of a Satellite Dish Without Proper Grounding

If you look at all of the satellite dish installations out there, you’ll inevitably find many that are not grounded. Of those that are, there is still a good chance that the installation is not fully compliant. Common mistakes installers should avoid include making the grounding electrode conductor too long or too short, using unlisted clamps at terminations, having excess bends, or connecting to a single ground rod but not bonding to other system grounds. The grounding means for a satellite dish must be located at the point of entrance to the building. In this particular installation, the grounding conductor is integral with the coax from the dish, but the installer did not bond it to other system grounds.

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Improperly Connecting the Equipment-Grounding Conductor to the System Neutral

The grounded conductor (white) and the grounding conductor (bare or green) should not be connected together except by the main bonding jumper in the service equipment. You must connect a grounded neutral conductor to normally noncurrent-carrying metal parts of equipment, raceways, and enclosures only through the main bonding jumper (or, in the case of a separately derived system, through a system bonding jumper). Make this connection at the service disconnecting means, not downstream. It's a major error to install a main bonding jumper in a box used as a subpanel fed by a 4-wire feeder. It's also wrong not to install it when the panel is used as service equipment.

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Failure to Properly Attach the Ground Wire to Electrical Devices

Wiring daisy-chained devices in such a way that removing one of them breaks the equipment grounding continuity is a common problem among electricians. The preferred way to ground a wiring device is to connect incoming and outgoing equipment-grounding conductors to a short bare or green jumper. The bare or green insulated jumper is then connected to the grounding terminal of the device.

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Failure to Properly Attach the Ground Wire to Electrical Devices

Wiring daisy-chained devices in such a way that removing one of them breaks the equipment grounding continuity is a common problem among electricians. The preferred way to ground a wiring device is to connect incoming and outgoing equipment-grounding conductors to a short bare or green jumper. The bare or green insulated jumper is then connected to the grounding terminal of the device.

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Improperly Grounding Frames of Electric Ranges and Clothes Dryers

This image shows two NEC-compliant 4-wire receptacles and an obsolete 3-wire receptacle in the middle. Before the 1996 version of the NEC, it was common practice to use the neutral as an equipment ground. Now, however, you must ground all frames of electric ranges, wall-mounted ovens, counter-mounted cooking units, clothes dryers, and outlet or junction boxes that are part of these circuits by a fourth wire — the equipment-grounding conductor. An exception permits retention of the pre-1996 arrangement for existing branch circuit installations only where an equipment-grounding conductor is not present. If possible, the best course of action is to run a new 4-wire branch circuit from the panel. If you must keep an old appliance, be sure to remove the neutral to frame bonding jumper if an equipment-grounding conductor is to be connected.

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Failure to Ground Submersible Well Pumps

Once upon a time, submersible well pumps were not required to be grounded because they were not considered “accessible.” Over the years, however, people started pulling the pump out, laying it on the ground, and energizing it to see if it would spin. As a result, if the case became live (due to a wiring fault), the overcurrent device would not function, causing a shock hazard. Per the 2008 NEC, a fourth equipment-grounding conductor is required that you must now lug to the top of the well casing. Although many electricians assume that one wire is a “ground” in a 3-wire submersible pump system, in actuality, submersible pump cable consists of three wires (plus equipment-grounding conductor) twisted together and unjacketed. Yellow is a common 240V leg, black is run, and red is start, which the control box energizes for a short period of time. Prior to the new grounding requirement, everything was hot.

7GroundingMistakesNon GroundingReceptacle

Here is a non-grounding type receptacle typically found in older homes. The NEC doesn’t say you have to immediately replace all noncompliant equipment with each new edition of the Code. Although it’s acceptable to leave the old “two prongers” in place — because an intact functioning equipment ground is such an obvious safety feature — most electricians tend to replace them. When you find yourself working with non-grounded receptacles, your best course of action is to run a new branch circuit back to the panel, verifying presence of a valid ground. Another possibility is to replace the two-prong receptacle with a GFCI. If replacement is necessary — and acquiring a ground is not feasible — you can also install a new non-grounding receptacle.

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Failure to Bond Equipment Ground to Water Pipe

How many times have you seen an improper connection like this in the field? Here someone used a water pipe clamp to improperly connect a ground wire to this ground rod. Screw clamps and other improvised connections do not provide permanent low impedance bonding. The worst method would be to just wrap the wire around the pipe or to omit this bonding altogether. In a dwelling unit, a conductor must be run to metallic water pipe, if present, and connected with a UL-listed pipe grounding clamp. This bonding conductor is to be sized according to Table 250.66 of the NEC, based on the size of the largest ungrounded service entrance conductor or equivalent area for parallel conductors.

GFCI Outlet1

Not Installing GFCIs Where Required

With the passage of each new Code cycle comes the increased use of GFCIs in more applications. As an electrician, make sure you know when and where these devices are mandatory. In dwelling units, for example, the 2008 NEC notes that GFCIs are required on all 125V, single-phase, 15A and 20A receptacles in: bathrooms; garages; accessory buildings with a floor at or below grade level not intended as a habitable room, limited to storage, work and similar areas; outdoors; kitchens along countertops; within 6 feet of outside edge of laundry, utility, and wet bar sinks; and boathouses. In other than dwelling units, GFCIs are required on all 125V, single-phase, 15A and 20A receptacles in bathrooms, kitchens, rooftops, outdoors, and within 6 feet of the outside edge of sinks.

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See the origial full article at: http://www.ecmweb.com/galleries/10-biggest-grounding-mistakes-avoid

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