Jan
21

Misunderstood After All This Time: Isolated Grounding

By Mark C. Ode, lead engineering associate for Energy & Power Technologies 

I recently received an email from a homeowner who was installing a high-end media room and had questions about his home's electrical system and the new circuits for the audio/video equipment. Before doing the installation, the homeowner had conducted internet research on the background requirements for audio/video installations. He also contacted an electrician friend, the audio/video equipment manufacturer from whom he had purchased his equipment, and an audio company engineer.

The audio equipment manufacturer provided a 65-page instruction manual with diagrams and illustrations to help with equipment installation. In addition, the electrician friend and the audio company engineer provided conflicting information and the homeowner was having trouble understanding the manual.

He found an article I had written for ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR on isolated ground receptacles and circuits, so he contacted me to see if I could clarify the project and get him on the right path.

In the end, he relied upon the information I gave him, along with his electrician, to perform a safe installation.

According to my interpretation of his email, the homeowner had a service panelboard on the outside of the house and wanted to install a six-circuit panel in his media room with four dedicated 20-ampere (A), 120-volt (V) circuits to supply the audio/video equipment. He wanted to install EMT from his service panel to the media room panel and to four separate metal boxes in the room with a single 20A, 120V dedicated circuit in each box. He also wanted a separate isolated and insulated equipment grounding conductor for each circuit. At the media room panel, he wanted a separate isolated equipment ground bar for the four isolated, insulated equipment grounding conductors.

He was confused about what was permitted and what was required.

The audio company engineer told him to install a "2/0 welding cable from the isolated equipment ground bar in the media room panel to two separated ground bars" located outside of the building. (I assume the engineer meant two ground rods.) This concept was proposed in the 1980s to help isolate computers, audio and video equipment, and other high-frequency sensitive equipment from the normal electrical grounding system. However, this installation would have created an isolated ground without a path for fault current back to the source and would not have adequately cleared a fault in one of the circuits by tripping a breaker or blowing a fuse.

This incorrect concept prompted an addition to the 1990 National Electrical Code (NEC) in 250-21(d) (covering objectionable current over grounding conductors), which states: "the provisions of this section shall not be considered as permitting electronic equipment being operated on AC systems or branch circuits that are not grounded as required by this Article. Currents that introduce noise or data errors in electronic equipment shall not be considered the objectionable currents addressed in this section."

In other words, totally isolating the equipment grounding conductors from the electrical system using two separate ground rods was not acceptable in 1990, and it is not acceptable now. Thankfully, I quickly cleared up that misconception for the homeowner.

High-frequency noise, other unwanted frequencies and signals, harmonics, and even a signal that originates within the electronic equipment itself may be capacitive and inductively coupled into the ferrous metal raceway, connecting the equipment and the panel, and can be reflected back into the equipment, causing major disruption and noise in the audio and video equipment. There are two sections in the NEC that will help someone trying to reduce electrical noise (electromagnetic interference) on the grounding system. Isolated grounding of permanently installed electronic equipment is dealt with in 250.96(B) and 250.146(D) with isolated grounding of cord-and-plug-connected electronic equipment.

In both cases, a separate insulated, isolated equipment-grounding conductor can be installed from the equipment (a nonmetallic bushing isolates the metal raceway from the metal frame of the electronic equipment) or from the isolated ground receptacle (the ground pin of the receptacle is not connected to the yoke of the receptacle) back to the main service or the source of the separately derived system without being connected to metal boxes or subpanels. This separation and isolation keeps unwanted noise and other frequencies from being coupled into the electronic equipment and still provides a path for fault current back to the source.

Metal boxes, metal subpanels, metal raceways and other metal enclosures from the permanent electronic equipment or isolated ground receptacles still are required to have normal equipment grounding. 

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See the original full article at: https://www.ecmag.com/section/codes-standards/misunderstood-after-all-time-isolated-grounding

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43 Hits
Jan
10

IEEE Publishes a Guide for Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations

 This guide provides mathematical models for designers and facility operators to apply in determining the arc-flash hazard distance and the incident energy to which workers could be exposed during their work on or near electrical equipment.

The IEEE Standards Association, Piscataway, N.J., has published a new guide for understanding and calculating arc-flash hazards in electrical equipment. The new IEEE 1584-2018—IEEE Guide for Performing Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations was produced in collaboration with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) as part of an effort to provide the industry with improved models and an analytical process to enable calculation of predicted incident thermal energy and the arc-flash boundary, IEEE said in a release announcing the guide's publication.

Sponsored by the IEEE Industry Applications Society, Petroleum & Chemical Industry (IAS/PCIC), this new technical standard is the result of extensive research and laboratory testing conducted by the Arc Flash Research Project.

"Our extensive, collaborative work with the NFPA has resulted in an IEEE standard that dramatically improves the prediction of hazards associated with arcing faults and accompanying arc blasts," said Konstantinos Karachalios, managing director of the IEEE Standards Association. "Contractors and facility owners will benefit from IEEE 1584 by being able to more thoroughly analyze power systems to calculate the incident energy to which employees could be exposed during operations and maintenance work, allowing them to provide appropriate protection for employees in accordance with the requirements of applicable electrical workplace safety standards."

IEEE 1584-2018 includes processes that cover the collection of field data, consideration of power system operating scenarios, and calculation parameters. Applications include electrical equipment and conductors for three-phase alternating current voltages from 208 V to 15 kV.

"The update to IEEE 1584 has empowered thousands of engineers conducting Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations," said Daleep Mohla, chair, IEEE 1584 Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations Working Group. "These efforts, conducted in partnership with the NFPA, have armed all stakeholders involved in Arc-Flash hazards to better protect employees and contractors in the working environment."

More information on IEEE 1584-2018 is available here.

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95 Hits
Jan
07

The Seven Types of Power Problems

Many of the mysteries of equipment failure, down-time, software and data corruption, are the result of a problematic supply of power. There is also a common problem with describing power problems in a standard way. This white paper describes the most common types of power disturbances, what can cause them, what they can do to your critical equipment, and how to safeguard your equipment, using the IEEE standards for describing power quality problems.

Our technological world has become deeply dependent upon the continuous availability of electrical power. In most countries, commercial power is made available via nationwide grids, interconnecting numerous generating stations to the loads. The grid must supply basic national needs of residential, lighting, heating, refrigeration, air conditioning, and transportation as well as critical supply to governmental, industrial, financial, commercial, medical and communications communities. Commercial power literally enables today's modern world to function at its busy pace. Sophisticated technology has reached deeply into our homes and careers, and with the advent of e-commerce is continually changing the way we interact with the rest of the world.

Many power problems originate in the commercial power grid, which, with its thousands of miles of transmission lines, is subject to weather conditions such as hurricanes, lightning storms, snow, ice, and flooding along with equipment failure, traffic accidents and major switching operations. Also, power problems affecting today's technological equipment are often generated locally within a facility from any number of situations, such as local construction, heavy startup loads, faulty distribution components, and even typical background electrical noise.

Widespread use of electronics in everything from home electronics to the control of massive and costly industrial processes has raised the awareness of power quality. Power quality, or more specifically, a power quality disturbance, is generally defined as any change in power (voltage, current, or frequency) that interferes with the normal operation of electrical equipment.

The study of power quality, and ways to control it, is a concern for electric utilities, large industrial companies, businesses, and even home users. The study has intensified as equipment has become increasingly sensitive to even minute changes in the power supply voltage, current, and frequency. Unfortunately, different terminology has been used to describe many of the existing power disturbances, which creates confusion and makes it more difficult to effectively discuss, study, and make changes to today's power quality problems. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has attempted to address this problem by developing a standard that includes definitions of power disturbances. The standard (IEEE Standard 1159-1995, "IEEE Recommended Practice for Monitoring Electrical Power Quality") describes many power quality problems, of which this paper will discuss the most common.

​Seven Types of Power Problems Summarized

For more information on this topic, please download White Paper 18, The Seven Types of Power Problems.

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See the original full article at: https://www.apc.com/us/en/support/resources-tools/white-papers/the-seven-types-of-power-problems.jsp

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121 Hits
Dec
31

We can all do more to advance NEC 210.8

Our industry has made numerous technological advances designed to protect homeowners, businesses and electrical workers. That makes every fatal electrocution in the home all the more distressing. Between 2010 and 2013, the U.S. saw an estimated average of 48 electrocution fatalities associated with consumer products per year, with large and small electric appliances chief among them1. Tragedies like these can be avoided, especially when the ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) technologies needed to prevent dangerous events are readily available.

As the principle NEMA representative at the National Electrical Code (NEC) Code-Making Panel Two, I saw public input asking for increased GFCI protection for the home during the 2017 code cycle. The code panel expanded the GFCI requirement for facilities other than dwelling units as part of section NEC 210.8(B). However, residential standards improvements were sidelined.


GFCI challenges and misconceptions

The rationale behind forgoing residential standards improvements was cost and convenience. One could argue, for example, that if GFCI requirements in a kitchen were to expand beyond sink and water areas and be specified for an appliance like a refrigerator, a potential nuisance trip could result in mass amounts of spoiled food. This inconvenience translates into real dollars for homeowners. Another barrier to code change is cost impacts for builders as increasing the number of GFCIs in a home raises electrical infrastructure expenses that must then be passed on to homebuyers.

As both an industry expert and a homeowner, I completely understand code update consequences. The change could likely put builders in an uncomfortable position of explaining why their costs have gone up seemingly overnight. Speaking as a VP of sales, justifying a price increase is always a challenge, and I take great pains to make sure my customers understand how the technology is worth the investment and can result in safer environments. The reality is that a residential requirement won't put much of a financial burden on contractors and homeowners. For instance, expanding GFCI requirements throughout a home in the $200k price range would increase the cost of a 30-year mortgage by mere pennies a month. By highlighting the features and benefits of GFCIs, homeowners are more likely to accept minimally higher costs to protect their loved ones.

Nuisance tripping is a valid concern from a convenience perspective. For the most part, however, the greater majority of unwarranted trips are behind us. When GFCIs first hit the market in the early 1970's, appliances inherently had leakage currents that flowed over the equipment grounding conductors, causing false trips. The development of appliances and their standards have come a long way as standards now place a cap on how much leakage current any single appliance is permitted to have. It would be bullish to say homeowners will never experience a false trip with a GFCI, especially if there's an un-listed product that generates nuisance currents on the circuit. But when we compare the small number of nuisance trips against markedly increased safety, there's simply no way to justify leaving the residential code as is.


Installing more residential GFCIs can help the industry

I understand how the wheels of progress spin; affecting change takes time. While I'm hopeful we can collectively approve GFCI changes for the whole home, realistically I'd be pleased with any positive strides. Something as simple as including 30-amp GFCI receptacles on clothes dryer circuits, for instance, would greatly enhance safety since dryers are often within proximity of a water source. If we demonstrate to homeowners how installing the additional GFCI on this circuit makes for a safer home, the hope is the industry will acclimate to slight cost increases and, over time, routinely install GFCIs throughout entire households.

The challenge ahead of us is to generate more dialogue during the 2020 code-review cycle, and we need new data to spawn conversation. Collecting data starts with one small step, one change in the way we do business. I ask that we as an industry consider going above and beyond NEC 210.8 guidelines and install additional GFCI protection in homes to increase safety and acquire the information needed to make change possible. 


P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the original full article at: http://www.eaton.com/us/en-us/company/news-insights/for-safetys-sake-blog/advance-nec.html

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151 Hits
Dec
17

9 ways beer and UPSs are alike

Here is a little fun before the holidays, by Eaton: 

 P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the original full article at: https://switchon.eaton.com/plug/journey/business-continuity/infographic/9-ways-beer-and-UPSs-are-alike-infographic

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219 Hits
Dec
03

For safety's sake: It's time for honest conversations about overcurrent protection

We're all human and we all make mistakes. But mistakes in the electrical field can prove costly. Codes and standards work together to reduce mistakes and save lives, which is what makes NEC (National Electrical Code) Section 240.87, Incident Energy Reduction, so significant. It was introduced to the NEC in 2011 as the first requirement focused on incident energy reduction since Ground Fault Protection of Equipment (GFPE) entered the NEC in 1971. Section 240.87 provides electricians and maintenance workers the overcurrent protective device technologies necessary to reduce distribution system energy. This mitigates damage to electrical equipment and, more importantly, reduces loss of life and injury from arc flash events.

Learn more about these topics by clicking the button below:

          • Why NEC Section 240.87 matters
          • Taking steps forward: perks and pitfalls
          • Striking the balance between safety and sales

P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the original full article at: https://eb.informabi.com/utility-operations-outage-planning-performance?partnerref=UM_UAI_DTNDec18WP_001

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306 Hits
Nov
26

The costs and causes of downtime...

The U.S. experiences more power outages than any other developed nation. And when the grid goes down, companies like yours suffer; every minute of downtime results in thousands of dollars lost in productivity. But what causes downtime? The truth is unforeseen mishaps and grid maintenance issues are often to blame. See how much downtime costs U.S. businesses and learn about all the crazy reasons the power suddenly goes out. What you discover may surprise you! 

P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the original full article at: https://switchon.eaton.com/plug/journey/business-continuity/infographic/costs-and-causes-of-downtime-infographic

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  277 Hits
277 Hits
Nov
19

For Safety's Sake - A News Blog by Eaton

Eaton has started a new education blog series that features their point of view about codes and standards to help educate and protect people and property from electrical hazards. They invite you to stay informed on the latest topics around electrical safety. 

 P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

Click the button above to be taken directly to the Eaton blog: http://www.eaton.com/us/en-us/company/news-insights/for-safetys-sake-blog.html?wtredirect=www.eaton.com/forsafetysake

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335 Hits
Nov
12

Is it necessary for utilities to "go digital"?

New technologies are fundamentally transforming the utility industry. As this transformation occurs, it is necessary for utilities to "go digital" and to take advantage of the massive amounts of data being produced. In leveraging data, companies can make faster, better decisions; improve operational efficiency; and reinvent how they operate.

Discover how IBM is working with businesses to help develop digital strategies that leverage data to address the complex challenges companies are facing.

This executive summary contains insight from Paul Davis, Executive Partner, IBM and Bryan Sacks, Head of Work and Asset Optimization Solutions, IBM. It covers the following key takeaways:

  • ​Technology is driving fundamental change in the utilities industry.
  • Utilities need to go digital.
  • Mobility offers unrealized potential, especially for field workers.
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning are technologies that are coming fast.

See Below:​

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See the origial full article at: https://www.tdworld.com/white-papers/data-renewable-resource-digital-reinvention?partnerref=UM_TDWUAIOct18_ES_004&utm_rid=CPG04000000918978&utm_campaign=22908&utm_medium=email&elq2=195afa440059413e81e2b758a65e0d65

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313 Hits
Nov
05

Trump names Chatterjee FERC chair

President Trump designated Commissioner Neil Chatterjee to be the chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The White House announcement on Wednesday ends weeks of speculation over the status of McIntyre, who has not made a public appearance since July and missed FERC's monthly meetings in September and October.

In a letter dated Oct. 22, the outgoing chairman wrote to President Trump, proposing that he "step aside from the position of chairman and its additional duties so that I can commit myself fully to my work as commissioner."

McIntyre's decision to stay on FERC will allow Republicans to preserve partisan parity on the five-person commission until GOP nominee Bernard McNamee is confirmed by the Senate. If he left FERC entirely, the commission would be left with two Democrats and a Republican chair.

The reshuffling will allow Chatterjee, a former staffer for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a second chance to leave his mark on FERC.

During his first stint with the gavel, Chatterjee oversaw FERC's initial response to the Department of Energy's proposed coal and nuclear bailout, filed in late Sept. 2017.

During debate over the plan, Chatterjee ruffled feathers at the commission for floating a short-term coal and nuclear subsidy proposal to the press before notifying fellow regulators and their staffs.

Though he eventually voted against the DOE's proposal, Chatterjee's presentation of that plan and subsequent comments defending it were unusual for a FERC regulator, who typically do not comment extensively on pending issues before the commission.

Chatterjee also received some criticism for social media posts mocking pipeline activists that disrupted a FERC meeting, particularly actor James Cromwell.

"Come at me bro!" Chatterjee wrote on Facebook in response to a post from Cromwell.

In recent months, however, Chatterjee has stayed away from controversy, instead focusing on pipeline cybersecurity and energy storage, two emerging areas of FERC concentration.

Chatterjee also said in July that he believes humans are causing climate change, though he has refrained from factoring greenhouse gas emissions into FERC decisions to the degree of his Democratic colleagues.

Chatterjee will take the reins at FERC amid concerns in the power sector that the commission — typically a nonpartisan policymaking body — is falling under the political influence of the Trump administration.

The concern centers on a figure he brought to the commission — Chief of Staff Anthony Pugliese.

The controversy began in July when Pugliese appeared on a podcast run by the right-wing media outlet Breitbart, denouncing New York Democrats for opposition to pipeline infrastructure in a manner unusual for FERC staffers.

Then, at a nuclear energy conference in August, Pugliese told the audience that FERC was working to identify power plants critical for national security — the first step in a leaked White House memo from the spring detailing bailout plans for coal and nuclear plants.

The power sector widely took the comments as an indication that FERC was working with the White House on the plan. Leading Congressional Democrats wrote a letter to FERC saying the comments "call into question the impartiality and independence of the Commission."

McIntyre defended Pugliese in the press, but the controversy deepened the next month when E&E News published emails from the chief of staff lauding far-right European politicians. A former Republican FERC staffer called for the chief of staff to step down.

Chatterjee appointed Pugliese to FERC during his time as acting chair but has repeatedly refused to answer questions about the controversy since it emerged this summer.

Besides political concerns, the new chairman will have a full slate of issues to address.

FERC is in the middle of a high-profile investigation into grid resilience it ordered when it rejected the DOE bailout plan in January. It also has pending dockets to reform the capacity markets in PJM and ISO-NE, as well as ongoing reviews of its natural gas pipeline policy and its implementation of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, a key renewable energy law.

P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the origial full article at: https://www.utilitydive.com/news/trump-names-chatterjee-ferc-chair/540532/

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369 Hits
Oct
29

Haunted Encounters of the Electrical Kind

Halloween is right around the corner, so as our treat to you, we've unearthed 10 scary stories based on allegedly true events and involving — what else? — electricity. 
Read on if you dare!

 P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the origial full article at: https://www.ecmweb.com/accidents-investigations/haunted-encounters-electrical-kind?NL=ECM-06&Issue=ECM-06_20181023_ECM-06_635&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_b&utm_rid=CPG04000000918978&utm_campaign=22813&utm_medium=email&elq2=bb960727bb8644d7af0737f18ed19b30

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324 Hits
Oct
23

Battery Storage Becoming the Norm for Utilities

Even as recently as two years ago, utility-scale lithium-ion batteries were considered cutting edge technology, and just a few forward-thinking utilities were experimenting with the concept. These days, though, it seems there are few utilities that are not building, or at least not considering, the technology.

In some cases, batteries are being linked with solar generation (called solar+battery). In other cases, the batteries are part of microgrids, which can include solar and other sources of generation. Microgrids appeal to utilities for remote-location generation/storage, reducing or even eliminating the need for transmission or distribution wired systems through rough, isolated terrain. And in still other cases, battery projects are being designed and built as a way to store surplus generation from traditional baseload generation (such as coal) and make it available later when customer demand increases.

Last week, for example, Duke Energy announced plans to spend $500 million on battery storage over the next 15 years, increasing its current storage capacity 20-fold. Current projects include a 9-megawatt (MW) battery project in Rock Hill, N.C., and a 4-MW battery project (part of a solar-powered microgrid) in Hot Springs, N.C.

Up north, New York Power Authority (NYPA), which to date has never been involved in battery storage, just announced plans for a 20 MW battery project in the northern part of the state, largely because current transmission constraints in the utility's service territory often prevent energy from being delivered downstate.

"Storing renewable energy, by using a battery to absorb excess generation for later delivery through projects like this one, is a viable solution to this transmission constraint," states the NYPA press release.

NYPA also believes the project will help to kick-start energy storage adoption throughout the state, supporting Gov. Cuomo's Energy Storage Roadmap, a plan designed to achieve massive energy storage targets in the state, including construction of 1,500 MW of energy storage by 2025.

"The North Country Energy Storage Project will be a first-of-its-kind for the Power Authority," said Gil Quiniones, president and CEO of NYPA. "Developing, operating and optimizing a lithium-ion battery system of this size will help us advance energy storage development efforts at the Power Authority, as well as position us to lead storage adoption across the state."

Out west, Hawaiian Electric Cos. (Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, and Hawaii Electric Light) just announced seven solar+storage projects on three islands, representing the largest infusion of renewable energy in the state's history. The seven solar projects, totaling 255 MW, will be connected to battery storage systems that will be able to capture up to four hours of electricity for later use. 

P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the origial full article at: https://www.ecmag.com/section/your-business/battery-storage-becoming-norm-utilities

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315 Hits
Oct
15

Omaha's first snowfall of the season causes slick roads, over 50,000 power outages

Kids played board games by flashlight, folks threw extra logs into the fireplace and at least one couple camped out in the driveway in their heated RV.

The wet, heavy snow that blew through eastern Nebraska on Sunday left thousands without power, yet people remained connected as they shared images via Facebook of their return to what some jokingly described as "pioneer days."

For others, especially the elderly and ill, the loss of power created anxiety and worry as people tried to sort out what to eat and how to stay warm overnight.

At the peak of the storm Sunday afternoon, the Omaha Public Power District reported 57,000 outages, according to spokeswoman Jodi Baker. About 10 p.m., that number remained at 27,000, according to the utility's website.

By 7:45 a.m. Monday, the utility was reporting 4,900 without power, most of those in Douglas County. Virtually all — perhaps 99 percent — should have power restored by midnight Monday, Baker said.

OPPD called in nearly 100 personnel to help with repairs. Additionally, the Nebraska Public Power District sent in crews to assist OPPD with power restoration, said Mark Becker, NPPD spokesman.

Eight school buildings in the Westside Community Schools district remained without power on Sunday night, and were at risk of not holding classes on Monday. The district said it would announce by 6 a.m. Monday if any school buildings were canceling classes.

The outage forced some grocery stores to scramble to save what refrigerated and frozen foods they could.

The Hy-Vee at 5150 Center St. had a generator kick in after losing electricity about 1 p.m., but the generator wasn't enough to power all of its freezers and refrigerators, a manager there said Sunday night.

Workers spent the early afternoon moving food to powered backup storage units on trucks, and what didn't fit had to be thrown out, the manager said.

Electricity was restored there about 8 p.m., he said. He expected the store to be restocked Monday.

The storm set daily records for snowfall, said Scott Dergan, meteorologist with the National Weather Service. Omaha officially recorded 1.5 inches of snow, though some areas saw about 3 inches. Lincoln's official total was 3.5 inches. Before Sunday, Lincoln had never recorded snow on Oct. 14, and Omaha had seen only a trace on that date, Dergan said. Weather records date to the late 1800s.

It wasn't either city's earliest snow, he noted. Omaha's earliest snow was Sept. 29, 1985, when three-tenths of an inch fell.


The cold front that accompanied the storm was expected to usher in the season's first killing freeze, with lows forecast to drop into the upper 20s overnight. Delicate plants and flowers will disappear from the landscape, and the freeze may be enough to ease the misery of allergy sufferers.

A much nicer week is in store: Sunshine and highs in the 40s and 50s.

On Sunday, the sight of sagging trees, weighted down by the snow, and the random sounds of cracking of branches brought back memories of the Oct. 24-26, 1997, snowstorm that devastated trees in eastern Nebraska. In that storm, 13 inches of wet, heavy snow fell over two days, littering the ground with fallen trees, broken limbs and downed power poles and wires. At the peak of the 1997 storm, upward of 130,000 homes and businesses and about 300,000 people were without power — many for up to two weeks.

With that storm on their minds, a number of people headed outdoors Sunday to brush snow from their trees.

Omahan Vince Shay was among those. The sunset maple in front of his Dundee/Elmwood Park home still bears the scars from 1997.

"If you don't like interesting weather, you shouldn't live in Nebraska," Shay mused.

A block or two east, neurosurgeon Steve Doran took a chainsaw to a fallen maple branch.

"Not a good combination," he quipped as he cleared the branch from the driveway.

Sunday's storm brought the most outages OPPD has seen since June 2017, when storms bearing powerful straight-line winds and tornadoes caused 76,000 outages.

Other hazards from Sunday's storm included power lines starting fires after contacting trees in several locations, and tree limbs blocking roadways.

Many traffic lights were not working. By early afternoon, there had been enough fender-benders on snow-slickened streets that the Omaha Police Department stopped responding to minor property damage collisions.

The Nebraska State Patrol reported that it assisted more than 100 drivers on the state's roadways Sunday and responded to dozens of crashes.

Sunday's snow also caused cancellation of events and early closings. The "Support the Girls" breast cancer awareness event in Elkhorn was postponed to Saturday. Vala's Pumpkin Patch closed about 2 p.m. due to safety concerns.

"We were having some branches falling, and it was just unsafe to have people on the farm," Jan Vala said. "People were here having fun, but safety comes first."

The Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium announced that its "Spooktacular" was canceled. Guests who pre-purchased tickets for the event will be contacted by the zoo's marketing department.

The storm blanketed much of the state. In northwest Nebraska, 5 to 7 inches of snow was reported. The 3 inches that fell in Valentine was enough to set a daily record there, according to the weather service. The previous record had been a trace of snow.

Bitterly cold weather was forecast across much of western Nebraska, and the weather service warned that wind chills could drop below zero in some parts of the state by Monday morning.

P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

See the origial full article at: https://www.omaha.com/news/metro/omaha-s-first-snowfall-of-the-season-causes-slick-roads/article_e04e6ad3-d38c-582f-a70f-e2d7c0dd737b.html

A field of soybeans, nearly ready for harvest, are blanketed in wet snow in Sarpy County, NE.
A man helps clean up a large branch blocking part of a street in Papillion, NE
Maple leaves droop under the weight of snow clinging to them in a Papillion, NE neighborhood Sunday - October 14
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430 Hits
Oct
10

Don't miss Schneider Electric's Design Engineer Seminar

This is the last opportunity of 2018 to see the constantly evolving Schneider Electric Technology Center in St. Louis!

Join the Schneider team for an interactive and hands on education session. This includes lab time and break out of electrical and mechanical sessions, the latest in critical power and cooling trends, industrial applications, prefabricated data centers, and helpful design tools that will keep you on the cutting edge of the latest technologies.

8 PDH credits given at each complimentary seminar.


P3 strives to bring you quality relevant industry related news.

For more educational opportunities, please visit P3's Power Quality University menu tab.

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  475 Hits
475 Hits
Aug
13

Important FAQ about Arc Flash protection Clothing

What you need to know:

What does 8 cal mean when people say, ‘8 cal shirt or garment’?

This term is really an abbreviation of, or slang for, 8 calories/cm², which are the units of measurement of an arc rating. If someone is saying they need an “8 cal” flame resistant (FR) fabric or garment, what they might really be saying they need is an arc rating of at least 8 calories/cm² or greater to meet a personal protective equipment (PPE) Category 2 requirement as defined by standard NFPA 70E. However, the PPE Category 2 level of protection only starts at 8 calories/cm² and goes up to 25 calories/cm², or PPE Category 3. Obviously, the difference in protection at 8 and 24 calories/cm² is significant, so it’s important to conduct your risk assessment prior to specifying a protection level and to understand that PPE Category 2 is a broad statement.

Is it ok to use fabric softener on FR clothing?

The laundering instructions for all FR and arc rated fabrics prohibit use of fabric softeners because most softeners are flammable and will accrete (build up) on the garment over time. The fabric is still FR, but now a flammable contaminant has been added to the surface and can be ignited by a flash fire or arc flash.

Can you use bug repellent with FR clothing?

When applying insect repellents to garments, a waterborne, permethrin-based insect repellent has been shown in testing to not have an adverse effect on flame resistance. However, it is not recommended to use DEET or DEET-containing insect repellents on any FR fabrics. DEET and DEET-containing insect repellents can be flammable, and therefore, have an adverse effect on the flame resistance of FR garments. It is important to note that DEET and DEET-containing insect repellents do not remove or destroy the flame resistance of fabrics, but they mask it. Once the garment is laundered and the DEET and DEET-containing insect repellents are removed, the flame resistance is still intact.

Is it possible to buy one uniform that protects against both arc flash and flash fire?

Yes, there are fabrics that protect against multiple hazards. However, it’s important to remember that not every fabric does. As you’re putting together your FR clothing program, make sure you discuss your hazards with your supplier and you know the FR fabric brand used to make your garments.

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Aug
01

Hot Topics: Arc Ratings, NFPA 70E, & More

Is it ok to use fabric softener on FR clothing? Is it possible to buy a uniform that protects against both arc flash and fire? What does 8 cal mean when people say, ‘8 cal shirt or garment’?

In our all-new FAQS, industry technical experts address the questions surrounding the hottest topics of 2018: NFPA 70E, Arc Ratings, and FR.

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Aug
01

Arc Flash Accidents

Take the time to read through these Forensic Casebook ar­ticles to help enhance practical safety les­sons for your own employees, using these case studies as a training resource for “what not to do.”

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Aug
01

Safer by Design: Arc Energy Reduction Techniques

There are inherent risks associated with working with energized electrical equipment. Even inspecting electrical equipment can expose employees to shock and other risks.

To enhance safety, work on electrical systems should be performed when those systems are de-energized.

Additionally, Zone Selective Interlock (ZSI) technology protects equipment by intelligently selecting faster trip times in coordinated systems, an advantage which can keep operators safe and productive. Learn more by reading this whitepaper.

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Jul
12

Eaton Issues Recall for Heavy Duty 30A and 60A Safety Switches

Eaton Heavy Duty Safety Switch Recall 0

Safety switches can potentially supply power when the handle is in the “off” position

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power management company Eaton has issued a product safety bulletin for certain Eaton Heavy Duty 30A and 60A Safety Switches intended for use in heavy commercial, utility, and industrial applications.

The safety switches referenced in the bulletin can potentially supply power when the handle is in the “off” position, subjecting the operator of the switch or any downstream equipment to risk of serious bodily injury or death. The company is not aware of any injuries at this time resulting from this issue,

The safety switches affected by the potential nonconformance were manufactured between Nov. 19, 2015, and Jan. 23, 2018, and primarily sold in the United States and Canada.

For more information related to the recall, visit www.eaton.com/hdss-advisorybulletin, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call Eaton’s Technical Resource Center at 1-877-ETN-CARE.

 

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Jul
09

Global Surge Protection Devices (SPD) Market Analysis By Technological Advancement, Regional Outlook And Forecast to 2026

The new research from MarketResearch.Biz on Global Surge Protection Devices (SPD) Market Report for 2018 destined to provide target audience with the latest information on Surge Protection Devices market with the help of refined data and opinions from Surge Protection Devices industry experts. The information included in the Surge Protection Devices research report is well-organized and a report is assembled by industry professionals and experts in the Surge Protection Devices field to make sure the quality of research.

The Surge Protection Devices analysis is backed by intensive and detailed secondary research that involves respect to numerous applied Surge Protection Devices static databases, national government documentation, pertinent patent and Surge Protection Devices administrative databases, latest news articles, Surge Protection Devices press releases, company yearly reports, financial reports, and range of internal and external Surge Protection Devices proprietary databases. This evaluated information is cross-checked with Surge Protection Devices business consultants from numerous leading firms within the Surge Protection Devices market. When the complete authentication method is done, the Surge Protection Devices reports are shared with Surge Protection Devices industry professionals for adding additional data and values and to earn their perceptive opinion on the Surge Protection Devices analysis. With such sturdy method of information extraction, Surge Protection Devices verification, and closing, we have a tendency to firmly endorse the standard of our Surge Protection Devices analysis. With such intensive and detailed analysis and thorough coverage of Surge Protection Devices data, it’s always a probability of clients finding their desired Surge Protection Devices (data within the report with an enclosure of key elements and valuable statistics in all consideration.

Get Free Sample Copy Of Report @ https://marketresearch.biz/report/surge-protection-devices-spd-market/request-sample

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